Philosophy - General

New Age Monkeys

The path of perdition has always been paved with lip-service to an ideal

Since the contemporary paradigm is built on axioms that are considered to be self-evident truths, enforcing "Truth" has been deemed a necessity. Socio-religious axioms include designating the good and the evil, and the evil frequently includes those who don’t accept the truth forwarded by some preacher. Look around and see how many preachers claim they come to bring love, light, peace and joy and tolerance, but those who do not accept that assertion are the forces of darkness, and so must be rejected and even destroyed. The preacher may say that he won’t do the destroying — God will do the dirty job — but the "Axiom" stands. So love, light and tolerance are only given lip service rather than actually practiced.

These same preachers prophesy the coming of the New Age, wherein control and suppression will disappear and we will all be free, whatever that means. Control is seen then as the synonym of suppression. God will again do the dirty job and do in the suppressers. It never occurred to these preachers to observe reality; if they did, they would have noticed that God always sides with the winner, not with the victims.

Perhaps, instead of doing in the suppressers, correction should come by providing tools to victims to undo their victimhood, and then, suppression would become meaningless. One of these tools is to remember that the meaning is not “out there” in physical reality, but in our heads. We attribute meaning by ways of relating. We make the definitions that create.

To generalize control as something suppressive is ridiculous and reminds me of Rudyard Kipling’s The First Jungle Book, wherein he refers to the monkeys as “the people without a Law”:

“We are great. We are free. We are wonderful. We are the most wonderful people in all the jungle! We all say so, and so it must be true,” the monkeys say. They have no laws, so there is nothing to control them — they feel free. But they live in chaos according to the Jungle Book; they are cruel, stupid and boisterous and very similar in looks to the man-cub, Mowgli. Perhaps Kipling chose the monkeys to represent those people who seek freedom in a life devoid of control by laws, doing lip service to love and kindness. That kind of attitude is the direct and necessary outcome of the linear paradigm that presumes the existence of an axiomatic truth external to our perception, and a defined God external to existence. But perhaps, God does not know that truth consists of self-evident axioms. Perhaps, God is the act of Creation itself and cannot differentiate between good and evil.

When you become fanatic about being right, when you stick to fundamentalist "Beliefs" and destructive dedication, even non-dogmatic views get passed on as dogma. For instance, your spiritual development and understanding the need to forgive and etc. can also be turned into dogma whereas real tolerance comes from empathy and compassion together with playfulness, lightness, a life without recipes in the sense that you check each situation for itself and act accordingly, and not based on an overall right or wrong. To get closer to your spiritual essence you need to undergo cleansing from within, which is getting rid of conditioning, dogma and stuck beliefs about how things are or should be. These are only hurdles on your way.

Beware of fanatics. There are many people with stray thoughts they believe to be divine information. Also, beware of those who really receive information but whose sources are stuck in past roles and value systems. They may often provide information that is no more truth than any live person’s thoughts. You can recognize those by their dogmatic approach and intolerant attitude towards anything which is not within the framework of what they believe true. Often they’ll address you through your fears and will try to coerce you to act in certain ways, thus denying you your God given gift, the freedom of choice. They’ll say they show you the right path to prevent you from making mistakes. True tolerance will allow mistakes, because not allowing you to make mistakes would be taking away your lessons from you. Mostly, they don’t know the way anyway, and they only judge, thinking they know what is right and what is wrong. However, when you go on a crusade against dogma, but you do it dogmatically, you’ll cause stuckness. A non-dogmatic viewpoint is dynamic, continuously inquisitive and developing.